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Adding to Jobless Woes, Little Turnover in the Workplace

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Adding to Jobless Woes, Little Turnover in the Workplace

Post by Guest on Sat Jul 16, 2011 8:28 am

The low turnover rate is probably one reason long-term unemployment has become a major problem. Most job openings occur because employees resign, presumably because they find a better job or believe they will be able to do so. The vacated jobs are available to be filled, perhaps by people who had been unemployed.

Presumably the number of employees unhappy with their current jobs has not declined, but over the most recent 12 months, 13 million fewer people quit jobs than did so during the year before the recession began at the end of 2007. Many of those who did not resign may be unhappy and frustrated that they are not able to change jobs.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/16/business/economy/fewer-firings-not-necessarily-good-news-for-labor-market.html?src=recg

Guest
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Re: Adding to Jobless Woes, Little Turnover in the Workplace

Post by jmainframe on Sat Jul 16, 2011 12:36 pm

Back in the good ol' days, when the normal unemployment rate was around 4%, the summer months were always slowest as far as changing jobs go (same as around the holidays). People want to use whatever vacation time they have, providing their massive workload allows them to take a vacation. This might explain part of it. The gainfully employed may also be waiting for an improvement in the job situation, so if they do change jobs they're not the first to be let go if a company decides one day to lay people off.

On a separate note, now that extended benefits have been taken away from the exhaustees for several months, did that move get them back to work? I DON'T THINK SO! Someone needs to conduct a study on this and shove it down congress' throat, especially the ones who use this as an excuse against adding weeks for the exhaustees.

NO, UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS DO NOT DISCOURAGE PEOPLE FROM LOOKING FOR WORK!!

jmainframe
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Re: Adding to Jobless Woes, Little Turnover in the Workplace

Post by Guest on Sat Jul 16, 2011 5:16 pm

DesperateInRI wrote:
The low turnover rate is probably one reason long-term unemployment has become a major problem. Most job openings occur because employees resign, presumably because they find a better job or believe they will be able to do so. The vacated jobs are available to be filled, perhaps by people who had been unemployed.

Presumably the number of employees unhappy with their current jobs has not declined, but over the most recent 12 months, 13 million fewer people quit jobs than did so during the year before the recession began at the end of 2007. Many of those who did not resign may be unhappy and frustrated that they are not able to change jobs.

I would hope that any intelligent person, no matter how displeased with his or her current position, would take the time to think long and hard about a career change with the economy the way it is. There are no guarantees right now and a fairly stable company could be anything but within months. Unless you were faced with harrassment or working doing something where you could be held liable if things weren't quite right, I would not recommend making a move until things pick up favorably all across the country.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/16/business/economy/fewer-firings-not-necessarily-good-news-for-labor-market.html?src=recg

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Re: Adding to Jobless Woes, Little Turnover in the Workplace

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