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UNIONS LOSE ANOTHER MAJOR BATTLE: Ohio Governor Signs Controversial Bill Into Law

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UNIONS LOSE ANOTHER MAJOR BATTLE: Ohio Governor Signs Controversial Bill Into Law

Post by Guest on Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:55 am

Gov. John Kasich on Thursday signed into law a limit on the collective bargaining rights of 350,000 public workers, defying Democrats and other opponents of the measure who have promised to push for repeal. His signature came a day after the measure was approved by the state House and Senate, which are led by his fellow Republicans.

State Senator Shannon Jones, a Republican and chief sponsor of the Ohio law, said curbing collective bargaining made sense when so many states, cities, counties and school districts faced daunting budget deficits. She said the law would help public employers hold down compensation costs, especially soaring health and pension costs, as a way to minimize any layoffs and reductions in public services, whether police patrols or garbage collections. “The economy has changed fundamentally,” Ms. Jones said. “Not only families and business have to change to adapt to tougher economic circumstances, but governments have to adapt, too.”

Who Says It's Not About Destroying Unions?

For those with a historical animus against the organizing and advancement of labor, the current strife in Wisconsin and other states offers a happy prospect for the resurrection of a dismal past of exploitation and the re-creation of a downtrodden working class.


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